The independent student newspaper of the University of Tulsa.

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O’Connor’s “Wise Blood” a bleak, brilliant analysis of modern life

By Helen Patterson
 Staff Writer

Flannery O’Connor was an American author who wrote complex, character-driven short stories, as well as two novels. If she had not died in 1952 at the age of 39, she would doubtless have furthered her quest to examine the moral and ethical systems (or lack thereof) which drive humans in their daily lives.

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81st and Lewis Ave: The Final Frontier

By Anna Bennet
Red Shirt 

This week, a crew of fearless and intrepid explorers plumbed the unknown depths of South Tulsa and made a shocking discovery: a previously unknown outpost under Starfleet command.

The base has been operating from its distant location since 1963, unbeknownst to residents  of the more civilized quadrant of Tulsa. “I’ve heard stories about that part of town, but I’ve never seen it myself,” admits Lotta Tribbles, a freshman Religious Studies major. “There’s this legend about a crazy religious university made of gold; wild tales of early curfews and repressed homosexuality. But I’ve always been skeptical.”

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Crewmen from the USS Enterprise make a pitsop at the Starfleet base at 81st and Lewis, as they’ve apparently been doing since 1963. Many of the base’s buildings are actually named after renowned Starfleet captains, like Bloku Timko who discovered Talos IV, and Oral the Great, who brought dentistry to the Klingon people.

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“It’s monopoly money”

By Patrick Creedon

The official Student Investment Fund has started up again for the year. 

It offers students in the University of Tulsa’s Bloomberg Top 50 Collins College of Business the chance to manage a real investment fund which contains real money which is sure to have very real consequences. 

Dr. Mona Poli of the Management Program offered, “It really gives our students a leg up in the real world to manage actual investment opportunities. We can’t expect our students to succeed if we don’t give them chances to royally mess up now.” 

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Tulsa Opera’s “Marriage of Figaro” superbly performed

By Helen Patterson
Staff Writer 

“The Marriage of Figaro” is possibly one of Mozart’s best-known comic operas. The work is based on the second play in a trilogy by French playwright Beaumarchais. It is set on the wedding day of Figaro (Seth Carico) and Susanna (Ava Pine) at the palatial estate of the powerful nobleman, Count Almaviva (Alexander Elliott). 

This year, the Tulsa Opera opened its 2013–14 season, themed “Love, Lust and Religion,” with Mozart’s classic on October 18 and 20. The show was sung in Italian, but English supertitles were projected above the stage, making it easy to follow the story.

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DIY Halloween Costumes

By Anna Bennet 

With Halloween quickly approaching, a few of you more popular individuals may start to get invitations to costume parties. You can blame the government shutdown all you want, but at the end of the day, either you are too poor or too lazy to go out and buy a well-made, fun costume. 

Never fear, in the age of Pinterest, anyone can make a terrible costume out of things lying around a dorm or apartment. Remember, cleverness and cleavage is worth more than construction!

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The Restaurant at Gilcrease elegant but disappointing

By Helen Patterson
and Kimberly Poff
Staff Writers 

The Restaurant at Gilcrease has one aspect which recommends it above all others: it accepts dining dollars as payment. It is possibly the only “fancy” restaurant which does so, and is certainly the only one which sells champagne. As such, these intrepid reviewers made the trip down 244 to see what could be purchased with campus funny money.

The Restaurant is nestled within the museum. Although it may be difficult to locate, friendly museum staff are happy to direct patrons, and admission to the museum is free to TU students. Given the fairly remote location of the museum, The Restaurant has an excellent view overlooking the forest. These reviewers even caught a glimpse of a bald eagle while seated near the far wall.

There were several soup and appetizer options, but the most interesting appetizer was the crawfish hushpuppies with chipotle remoulade. The hushpuppies themselves were crispy, and maintained a good texture. Biting into them was delightful. Unfortunately, there was too much cheese, and this overwhelmed the flavor of the crawfish. We did not receive any remoulade, so whether or not it was delicious remains a mystery.

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Holiday Insanity

By Alexander White
Student Writer 

Keith had been Christmas shopping for his two kids at the mall all day and was worn thin. The venture had taken its toll, and when he started driving home in his blue minivan he was not in a good mood. The path home took him along a sweeping empty country road. 

Looking in his rearview mirror, he saw another middle-aged man driving a minivan down the narrow road accelerate to pass him to his left, and then immediately slow down to take the next right. Keith slammed on the breaks and a few presents in the front seat spilled onto the floor. Words he’d rarely used since college spewed from his mouth and he flipped off the man in the minivan. The man stuck his hand out the sun-roof and proudly displayed his longest finger in response. 

Keith gripped the steering wheel ‘till his knuckles turned white and he turned right, boiling with rage, following the man even though it wasn’t the direction he needed to go. The two minivans’ engines strained painfully as both drivers had their feet to the floor. Keith pulled up to the left of the other man’s car and yelled obscenities, glaring in between breaths. The other man did the same and they ate road and rubber together. They were taking up both lanes of the road and approaching dangerous speeds in their twin clunkers. 

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Tulsa’s Bridenstine supported the shutdown

By Nikki Hager
Staff Writer 

After 16 days of a partial government shutdown, Congress passed legislation reopening the government, just hours before the US was to reach the debt ceiling. However, this solution is only temporary.  

Unless Congress can pass additional legislation, the government will shut down again on Jan. 15 and reach the debt ceiling on Feb. 7.  

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Vouchers a misuse of education funds

By Giselle Willis
Staff Writer 

In early October, twelve Oklahomans filed a lawsuit against the Oklahoma Department of Education over the continued dissemination of state taxes towards the tuition of special-needs children attending private schools. 

According to the Tulsa World, the Lindsey Nicole Henry Scholarships for Students with Disabilities provide state funding for disabled children to attend private schools, but the plaintiffs, who include college professors, retired and current superintendents, an Oklahoma senator, a retired judge and a parent of a disabled child, argued that “the Oklahoma Constitution only authorizes the Legislature to fund ‘a system of free public schools wherein all the children of the state may be educated.’” 

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Malala Yousafzai: eventual Nobel laureate

By Morgan Krueger
Staff Writer 

Few people are brave enough to stand up to the Taliban, and not many of those who do are eleven years old. That is how old Malala Yousafzai was when she started on the path to becoming the world advocate for education that she is today.

It all started in 2008, when BBC started looking for a new way to cover the growing influence of the Taliban in Swat Valley, Pakistan. They hit upon the idea of having a schoolgirl write about how the Taliban’s ban on girls’ attending school affected their daily lives. Yousafzai agreed to write, protected under the pseudonym Gul Makai.

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C-USA mid-season football roundup

By Jesse Keip
Student Writer 

The Golden Hurricane (2–4, 1–1 C-USA) aims for a C-USA championship repeat, but the tough 30–27 overtime loss to Rice has the Hurricane in fourth place in the C-USA West division, behind North Texas, Rice and the surprisingly successful Tulane.

While the Hurricane topped UTEP in El Paso last weekend, UTEP is contending for the cellar of C-USA West with a winless conference record. Even though the UTEP squad is relatively weak, the TU victory can nonetheless serve as a stepping stone to more conference success.

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News and Notes

  • Saturday was a weekend of upsets in the world of college football. Unranked Central Florida kicked off the festivities early by beating No. 8 Louisville 38–35 on Friday night. On Saturday, No. 5 Florida State dominated No. 3 Clemson with a 51–14 victory, Ole Miss hit a field goal with two seconds left to beat LSU 27–24, No. 24 Auburn marched down the field on its last drive which concluded with a touchdown to beat No. 7 Texas A&M 45–41, Tennessee shocked No. 11 South Carolina 23-21 with a field goal as time expired, Vanderbilt handed No. 15 Georgia their second loss by a score of 31–27, Arizona State stomped No. 20 Washington 53–24 and No. 14 Mizzou, a three point underdog to No. 22 Florida, won 36–17.
  • Mike Smith of the Phoenix Coyotes became the 11th goalie in NHL history to score a goal. The goal came Saturday night against the Detroit Red Wings. The puck crossed the goal line with .1 seconds left on the clock for the league’s 14th goalie goal; the seventh which was actually a shot on net by the goalie credited with the goal.
  • The first BCS rankings of the year were released Sunday evening. Alabama took the top spot this week followed by Florida State, Oregon, Ohio State and then Mizzou to complete the top five.
  • The Red Sox and Cardinals advanced to the World Series. Both teams had the best record in their respective leagues this season. This is only the third World Series in the Wild Card era in which the pennant winners were also the league leaders in the regular season.